Vocalist - Tenor
Acclaim
Portland Opera closes its season with a Gilbert & Sullivan romp

“As the stalwart, duty-bound Frederic, tenor Ryan MacPherson was ... firm-voiced and funny.”

James McQuillen, Oregonian
Postcard from Morocco - Portland Opera
“MacPherson stole the show as Heurtebise in Portland Opera’s debut production of Philip Glass’s Orphee a few years back and he very nearly stole last night’s performance as well.... I could listen to MacPherson until my feet grew into the floorboards, and that is not a common reaction for me to a tenor voice. His has a little of that baritone richness that adds so much savor to a tenor sound, and his delivery carries the ease and sense of speech. It looked like he was fun to play off of for the other characters as well. Man with a Paint Box is an extremely exposed role vocally — at times, he is the only sound on stage, the orchestra sitting idle in the pit — his music incorporating challenges that on American Idol would prompt raucous cheering. Very nicely done.”
Katie Taylor, Oregon ArtsWatch
Postcard From Morocco - Portland Opera
“‘Postcard’ is an ensemble opera to such an extent that, as in Verdi’s ‘Falstaff,’ multiple characters simultaneously sing different texts that have little chance of being understood or adequately supertitled. If there’s a central role, it’s the Man with a Paint Box and a name, Mr. Owen, sung by MacPherson with both strength and sensitivity.”
Mark Mandel, The Oregonian
A Show of Love: Farewell, City Opera
“There were standout performances by the tenor Ryan MacPherson, the mezzo-soprano Jennifer Rivera, the baritone Sidney Outlaw, the soprano Amy Burton and the soprano Tonna Miller.”
Anthony Tommasini, New York Times
Saint-Saëns' LA PRINCESSE JAUNE - Buxton Festival
“Tenor Ryan MacPherson found all the right colors for the volatile, somewhat unstable artist who finally reels back from his psychological brink.”
George Hall, Opera News
Gounod's LA COLOMBE - Buxton Festival
“Ryan MacPherson returned as a vital, quick-thinking Horace, his warm and lively tenor up to all demands.”
George Hall, Opera News
Double French: the 35th Buxton Festival
“Horace [is sung by] the versatile Ryan MacPherson again, ideally suited to this role.”
Philip Radcliffe, Arts Desk
Double French: the 35th Buxton Festival
“Ryan MacPherson, a fine tenor, is suitably distracted as Kornélis.”
Philip Radcliffe, Arts Desk
The Fall of the House of Usher
“Ryan MacPherson’s vaguely androgynous Roderick was quite effectively characterized and enhanced with just enough bite in the tone of his attractive tenor to bring a requisite hysteria to the tormented Lord of the Usher manor.”
Mark Thomas Ketterson, Opera News
THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER - Long Beach Opera
“The cast was uniformly excellent … especially Ryan MacPherson as a rich-voiced, manic and obsessed Roderick. He even played his own guitar.”
Timothy Mangan, Opera News
Chicago's Non-Lyric Opera Scene
“MacPherson’s Roderick was convincingly obsessed.”
Wynne Delacoma, Musical America
Chicago Opera Theater's 'Usher' launches an exciting new era
"Ryan MacPherson grabs Roderick’s multifaceted personality and has a tenor both strong and seductive enough to ride the score’s high passage work."
Andrew Patner, Chicago Sun-Times
COT opens season with a mixed Chicago debut for Glass's "Usher"
“The cast was largely inspired … serving the music well. Ryan MacPherson’s strong tenor handled the high tessitura handily, and the singer conveyed Roderick’s haunted vulnerability as well as his unhinged anger in Act 2.”
Lawrence A. Johnson, Chicago Classical Review
The Fall of the House of Usher (Chicago Opera Theater)
“MacPherson and Gregory have a great vocal chemistry.”
Clint May, Chicago Theater Beat
Long Beach Opera's curious take on Glass' The Fall of the House of Usher
“Baritone Lee Gregory and tenor Ryan MacPherson were both excellent as William and Roderick.”
Ted Ayala, Bachtrack
Latest Opera Performance Changes Preconceptions
“Ryan MacPherson’s Roderick was such a complete picture of a tortured soul that you kind of forgot how beautiful his ringing, clarion tenor was.”
Jim Ruggirello, Gazettes (CA)
Long Beach Opera charts 'The Fall of the House of Usher'
“Baritone Lee Gregory and tenor Ryan MacPherson were fine as William and Roderick, respectively.”
Richard S. Ginell, Los Angeles Times
'The Fall of the House of Usher' by Philip Glass at Long Beach Opera
“Roderick Usher (the excellent tenor Ryan MacPherson) …”
Dave Gregson, Opera West
The Fall of the House of Usher: Opera Review
“MacPherson shrewdly opts to make Roderick seem as strong as he may be weak.”
Myron Meisel, Hollywood Reporter
OF MICE AND MEN - Utah Opera

“Other cast standouts included tenor Ryan MacPherson in a fiery performance as the misanthropic ranch foreman Curley.”

Robert Coleman, Opera News
Review: Utah Opera's 'Of Mice and Men' is gripping theater
"Tenor Ryan MacPherson plays her brute of a husband [Curley] with cobra-like menace; it's a particularly apt match of music and character."
Catherine Reese Newton, Salt Lake Tribune
ROMÉO ET JULIETTE - Dayton Opera
"Ryan MacPherson and Joanna Mongiardo were an ideal pair of lovers as Roméo and Juliette, both strikingly handsome and youthful, and both singing with solid sound and vocal beauty."
Charles H. Parsons, Opera News
"Ryan MacPherson stole the show. MacPherson's keen-timbered tenor negotiated the high tessitura with grace"
David Shengold, Opera News
"For this production to succeed, it was especially important for the singers, as well as conductor Martin André, to embrace Offenbach's light, bouncy musical style and buy into Astafan's irreverent take. No one did that better than tenor Ryan MacPherson, who portrayed Pluto's vanity and libidinous machinations with relish."
Kyle MacMillan, Opera News
"Ryan MacPherson brought his bright tenor voice and dashing presence to the sinister Anatol."
Anthony Tommasini, New York Times
"Ryan MacPherson ennobles the caddish stances of Anatol with a ringing tenor and exemplary diction."
Martin Bernheimer, Financial Times
"The agile soprano Elizabeth Futral and the sweet-toned tenor Ryan MacPherson were standouts as Violetta and Alfredo in the Libiamo duet and chorus from Verdi's Traviata."
Anthony Tommasini, New York Times
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